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'Under God' misunderstood
Opinion by Yonie K. Espiritu, Sports editor

When I was a little girl, some days, I just did not feel like standing up and saying the Pledge of Allegiance.

Fortunately, my teachers didn’t insist on it, although that may seem nonpatriotic to the eyes of an on-looker, their behavior is true to some of America’s most important principles.

Perhaps, they were not the judges in the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, but my teachers recognized that there are some aspects of the Pledge that could be offensive.

What a great country, if I didn’t feel like saying the Pledge I didn’t have to do it.

On June 26 a San Francisco court ruled that the term “…under God” was unconstitutional. The case was brought to the court’s attention when Dr. Micheal Newdow, felt that his daughter’s rights were being violated every time she had to recite the Pledge of Allegiance.

As an alumna of a tolerant grade school, I can’t help but wonder why this child wasn’t given the right to say “no” to the Pledge. Resistance to the Pledge- already illegal- would be a sure indication to any parent that a school’s policy needs to be examined and that students there should be given the right to abstain.

I recognize that Dr. Newdow doesn’t want his daughter exposed to religions that are not her own, and that is his right. He must then see to it that he educates his child on his family’s beliefs to better prepare his child when she is confronted with similar decisions.

Yet, it is also his duty to make sure that the rights of others are not infringed upon in this process. When you delete God from the Pledge, you take away the choice all together.

I do regret abstaining from the Pledge as a child, and I take advantage of the opportunities to recite it today. But now, my right to say the Pledge that I have come to know is no more.

It’s nice to know that the mother of the young girl agrees with me. In fact, her mother feels her daughter is “perfectly fine” saying the pledge. Which makes me wonder if this is a court battle or a custody battle?

 

 

 

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