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'Post Happy Hour' challenges tradition

by Siv Palm, staff writer

 

Eggshells hanging in midair, fat Buddhas dancing on lotus blossoms to define nirvana, and images of star constellations make up a new exhibition at Hawai‘i Pacific University’s windward art gallery.

Post Happy Hour is a mixed media exhibition where local artists Frank Sheriff, Dan Nishiyama, and Lianne Rozelle present their work. It opened Nov 28 and will run until January 21.

 

The most striking pieces are Dan Nishiyama’s eggshells. With pieces such as What Came First, and Falling Through the Cracks, he shows great skill in calling attention to universal questions. The works are beautifully crafted, and they are given good space in the exhibition.

Nishiyama sees art as therapy “You go through a process and try to figure yourself out from the feedback you get,” he said. He encourages the viewers to find their own meaning in his art.

Rozelle’s artworks are pictures of traffic and street lights at night, seen as constellations of stars. She has captured constellations such as Gemini and Virgo, and actually draws in the connecting lines. The works are decorative, but not too stimulating. You can find basically the same constellations, only clearer, in any astronomy book. Still Rozelle reminds us that some patterns are archetypical.

The last artist, Frank Sheriff, who is also the coordinator of the exhibition, is responsible for the dancing Buddhas.

Many small colorful, fat Buddha figures inside a big steel lotus make up his main piece, This Must Be Nirvana I. The sculpture has a handle that one can turn, to make the small Buddhas dance.

Sheriff has a few smaller Buddha pieces, all with the same features.

This is an original exhibition that should not be missed. While Sheriff said it is “permeated by a feeling of melancholy,” his own works defer melancholy, and make us laugh at the unusually mobile avatars.

HPU’s art gallery is located on the windward campus. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free, and the public is invited.

 

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