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Opinion

Saida Oliver, editor

 

 
   

Can we afford to ignore the Carlyle Group?

Since the beginning of the “war on terrorism,” the Carlyle Group, a U.S. private equity fund, has capitalized on the U.S. Army. The headquarter of the 11th largest defense contractor in the United States is located in the heart of Washington D.C. on Pennsylvania Avenue, surrounded by the White House, the FBI, and the Capitol building, the focal point of American supremacy. Some say that its address reflects its association with the powerful “ex-presidents club.” The group’s ruthless business style and political clout make it easy to see obvious problems within our current system of government.

   

Assisted suicide is a moral right

Though John Ashcroft has left the Justice Department, his religious conservative legacy lives on in the form of a lawsuit designed to overturn Oregon’s physician-assisted suicide law. The Supreme Court has agreed to hear the case, which up till now has hinged upon legal technicalities instead of addressing the real issue: whether an individual has a right to commit suicide.

 

 

Hookers have rights, too

Has prostitution been legalized? Walking in Waikiki, one would think so. Clear high heels, short skirts and cleavage stretch as far as the eye can see, yet the cops seem to be looking the other way. “Hawai‘i’s economy is based on tourism. The hookers are just another tourist attraction that brings in money,” claims 11-year Waikiki resident Joe Overman. So the question begs to be asked: just who is in bed with whom?

   

Conservatives' accusations threaten Supreme Court's power

As the Supreme Court prepares to hear argument in the Ten Commandments cases, conservatives can be heard voicing their familiar complaints against “judicial activism,” the supposed tendency of judges to override majority rule by writing their own subjective beliefs into law.

   
   
   
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