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by Kalamalama staff

 

A police officer on Maui for almost 20 years, Gosney escaped the communal settlement in Guyana, South America, on Nov. 18, 1978, suffering three bullet wounds and the loss of his five-year-old son, Mark. On that day, more than 900 of Gosney’s fellow residents were either murdered or committed suicide by cyanide poisoning in what is now known as the largest mass murder/suicide in American history.

Gosney and his late wife, Cheryl, joined the People’s Temple in 1971. In March 1978, Gosney and his son moved to the settlement in Guyana, known as Jonestown, where, he said, he witnessed much violence.

Gosney moved to Hawai‘i in 1982 and still lives here today. He has used his experiences to contribute to a number of projects, including a play, a possible movie, and several publications.
The Social Movements class is taught by an HPU sociology instructor, Dan Morgan. The course serves as an analysis of several historic and current social movements, techniques for change, and the implications for human development.
 

 

 

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