.Sections

.Front Page

.News

.Student Life

.Science & Environment

.Arts & Entertainment

.Etcetera

.Business

.Opinion

.People & Places

.Women's Life

.Military Matters

.Lifestyles

.Sports

 

.Archives

.About Us

 

 

Lifestyles

Berna Bass, editor

 

Eddie would go!
A look at the inspiration for big wave surfing

Two great surfing legends come from Hawai‘i, Duke Kahanamoku, Olympic Gold Medal swimmer and popularizer of modern surfing, and Eddie Aikau, who ruled the biggest waves. While much of the world knows about Duke Kahanamoku, because of his Olympic and film history, few know about Eddie outside of the islands and the surfing community, where his story is kept alive not only through the memories of people who knew him, but also through the big-wave surfing competition that bears his name. [More]


A surfer cuts down the face of a wave at Waimea Bay on O'ahu's North Shore.

Photo by Josh Nathan

......................................................................................................................................................

The Eddie

When winter waves reach face heights of more than 30 feet, the “Eddie,” formally known as the Quiksilver: Big Wave International In Memory of Eddie Aikau Surf Competition, takes place at Waimea Bay. It’s only open by invitation to champion big wave surfers from around the world to compete and to give homage to the great surfing legend, Eddie Aikau. This year marks the 21st anniversary of the competition since 1985.

Staying true to the roots of big wave surfing, the “Eddie” doesn’t allow competitors to use jet skis to tow them into the waves.

Instead, competitors must paddle out and take on the waves that can be as high as six-story buildings.

Surfing competitions always equal big money for the winners. Here is what the winners of the “Eddie” receive according to surf.quiksilver.com/2005/eddie/about.php, the official site for the competition: “Total prize money is $86,000. First place receives $55,000, 2nd $10,000, 3rd $5,000, 4th $3,000, 5th $2,000, 6th $1,000, and 7th through 24th place each receives $600.”

Throughout the day, 24 surfers compete in two rounds, depending on the ocean conditions. In each round, competitors have three to four rides per heat. The four best scores equal their totals.

......................................................................................................................................................

The Hokule'a: Star of Gladness

The Hokule‘a (meaning Star of Gladness) is a replica of ancient Polynesian canoes typically used by Hawaiian ancestors to sail from one side of the Pacific to another. It measures only 69 feet, whereas ancient canoes have been described in the journals of European visitors as 100 feet long.

The Hokule‘a is important because it proved to skeptics that ancient Polynesians were capable of sailing around the Pacific. The popular theory before the maiden voyage of the Hokule‘a to Tahiti in May of 1976 was that our ancestors found the islands accidentally. This is contrary to our oral history.

From 1985-87, Hokule‘a sailed more than 16,000 miles of traditional migratory routes from Hawai‘i to Tahiti, Rarotonga (Cook Islands), Aotearoa (New Zealand), Tonga, and Samoa-the Voyage of Rediscovery.

This voyage demonstrated that it was possible to navigate these routes without instruments and that, contrary to popular theories, it was possible for traditional voyaging canoes to sail against the prevailing winds by taking advantage of seasonal wind shifts. Hokule‘a voyages to date had demonstrated that the ancient Polynesians could have intentionally settled the Polynesian Triangle — an area of 10 million square miles, the largest nation on Earth — one of the greatest feats of exploration in human history. But while scientific research was the impetus for these initial voyages, the recovery and perpetuation of Polynesian voyaging and navigation traditions became the main emphasis. The voyages of Hokule‘a inspired pride among Polynesians for their history and heritage, and sparked a revival of interest in canoe building, sailing, and navigation.” (From http://www.pvs-hawaii.com/about_pvshistory.htm).

In a blog Ano Masima writes about Nainoa Thompson, the captain of the Hokule‘a: “He is a true leader. The next day, we were honored again to hear Nainoa tell us of his travels, including the sad story of when the Hokule‘a capsized, and he unfortunately lost one of his best friends, Eddie Aikau.”

......................................................................................................................................................

Back

Kalamalama, the HPU Student Newspaper. All rights reserved.

Web site designed by Robin Hansson.and maintained by Christina Failma

Untitled Document