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Forwarded by Joanne Farmer

Johns Hopkins Medical Center included the following information in a recent newsletter, and locally Dr. Edward Fujimoto, Wellness Program Manager at Castle Hospital, appeared on local television to explain some of the dioxin-related health hazards posed by the way everyone habitually uses plastic containers and plastic wraps.

People who want to avoid contracting cancer should add the following to the lists of things—such as smoking, and drinking to excess—they do to avoid various forms of the disease:

1. No plastic containers in microwave.

2. No water bottles in freezer.

3. No plastic wrap in microwave.

According to the newsletter, freezing water-filled plastic bottles releases dioxins from the plastic. So does heating our food in the microwave using plastic containers.

Fujimoto urges people to avoid heating foods in plastic containers, especially foods that contain fat. The combination of fat, high heat, and plastics releases dioxin into the food, Fujimoto said, and ultimately into the cells of the body.

Dioxins are one of the reasons, Fujimoto explained, why fast food restaurants have moved away from foam containers to paper.

Fujimoto recommended using glass, Corning Ware, or ceramic containers for heating food. Results are the same, only without the dioxins.

Such foods as TV dinners, instant ramen, and soups, should be removed from the container and heated in something else. Paper isn’t bad, Fujimoto said, but often we don’t know what is in the paper. It’s safer, Fujimoto said, just to use tempered glass or Corning Ware.

Fujimoto also pointed out that Saran wrap is just as dangerous when placed over foods to be cooked in the microwave. As the food is nuked, the high heat causes poisonous toxins to actually melt out of the plastic wrap and drip into the food. He recommends covering food with a paper towel instead.
 

 

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