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October
Calendar

Christina Failma, editor

HPU Events

Sugar Rats Disco
Hawai‘i Loa Campus
Through Nov. 17
An exhibition of work by Vince Hazen will open at the HPU Art Gallery. For more information, call 544-0287.

TGIF
Downtown and Hawai‘i Loa Campus
Oct. 6
Relax and enjoy Fridays on campus with planned events and entertainment. For more information, call 544-0277.

Music on the mall
Downtown Campus
Oct. 13
Take an afternoon break and enjoy some live music on upper Fort Street Mall. For more information, call 544-0277.

Music & Dance

Latin Fever
Pipeline Cafe
Every Wed. at 9 p.m.
Come to Pipeline for “Latin Fever” every Wednesday. DJs will be spinning salsa, merengue, cha cha, bachata, reggae, and Latin house in two separate rooms. Complimentary dance classes will be given from 9-9:30 p.m. by Jerome Ramos.

Jazz Minds Art & Café
Offers live jazz six nights a week, Monday through Saturday, at 1661 Kapiolani Blvd. For more information, call 945-0800.

At the Contemporary Museum

Contemporary Filipino-American Artists of Hawai‘i
First Hawaiian Center
Through Oct. 3
In honor of the 100th anniversary of the Filipino immigration to Hawai‘i, this exhibition brings together artists of Filipino descent who either currently live and work in Hawai‘i or who have moved away but retain a strong connection to the Hawaiian islands. For more information, call 526-0232.

Dreaming of a Speech Without Words: The Paintings and Early Objects of H. C. Westermann
Through Nov. 19
Dreaming of a Speech Without Words also includes early painted objects, sculptures, and drawings, many of which have never been shown publicly. Through a dialogue between and among these early works, the exhibition attempts to shed light on Westermann’s enthusiasm for painting in the beginning of the 1950s and the implications this had for his development as an artist best known at the end of the decade for his finely crafted wooden sculptures. For more information, call 526-0232.

Hawai‘i Theatre

Kamau Pono IX
Oct. 6 at 7 p.m.
Tony Conjugacion and Halau Na Wainohia present a very special concert this year as they celebrate the life of a formidible musical force in Hawaiian and choral music- Leila Hohu Ki‘aha. Tickets are available at the box office for $23. For more information, call 528-0506.

Celebrate the Arts
Throught Oct. 21
Historic preservationist, author, arts philanthropist, and civic volunteer Nancy Bannick will be honored with the Alfred Preis Award for 2006. Entertainment will be provided by Grammy Award-winning Daniel Ho, with Halau Hula Ka No‘eau, Iolani School Orchestra, Randy Drake, George Kahumoku, Herb Ohta Jr., and Dean Taba. Fore more information, call 533-2787.

Hawai‘i Theatre Docent Tours
Tuesdays at 11 a.m.
Experience Hawai‘i’s history as you tour the renovated Hawai‘i Theatre, built in 1922 and proclaimed the “Carnegie Hall of the Pacific.” A mini-concert on the Robert Morton Theatre Organ is included as Honolulu’s past comes alive thanks to trained docents who share colorful anecdotes about this jewel of Chinatown.

At the Academy of Arts

Trade Taste and Transformations: Jingdezheng Porcelain for Japan, 1620-1645
Through Oct. 8
Chinese porcelains made for Japanese use and taste in the early-17th century is the subject of this exhibition of more than 50 ceramic plates, boxes, and bowls. The exhibition illustrates the impact of Chinese decorative schemes on wares made specifically for Japan and illustrate the impact of Japanese taste on the shape of vessels.

Tattoo Traditions of Hawai‘i: Origional Drawings by Jacques Arago
Through Nov. 5
Over 40 donated original drawings by Arago in this exhibition with 18 that have been rarely shown. This display sheds new light on the customs of dress and tattoo in ancient Hawai‘i. For more information, call 532-8700.

Enriched by Diversity
Ongoing through 2006
Tuesday - Saturday at 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

A semi-permanent installation featuring two- and three-dimensional works by over 250 Hawai‘i-based artists from the Art in Public Places Collection. Inspirational themes in the installation revolve around rediscovering Hawaiian heritage, Asian roots, social consciousness, the land, sea, and cultural traditions.

Tour and Tea
Tours are led by volunteer docents that have completed a rigorous two-year training program. Visitors will explore the galleries, learn more about art and culture, and socialize over a cup of tea. Discussions in the galleries offer insight into many cultures and time periods. For more information, call 532-8700.

Films at the Doris Duke Theatre
Join the Doris Duke Theatre e-mail newsletter to hear about upcoming films. To subscribe, send an e-mail to film@honoluluacademy.org. For more information, call 532-8700.

House of Sand (Casa de Areia)
Oct. 2, 3, 4, 5 at 7:30 p.m.
Oct. 3, 4, 5 at 1 p.m.

This film follows the life and events of strong-willed and indomitable set of mothers and daughters over 70 years. Watch as the actresses perform different roles of what it means to be a mother and daughter.

Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown (Mujeres Al Borde De Un Ataque De Nervios)
Oct. 6 at 1, 4, and 7:30 p.m.
The film follows Pepa as she goes through the trials and tribulations of a failed relationship with her lover, Ivan. Through her crazy adventure, she meets many of Ivan’s family and friends.

All About My Mother (Todo Sobre Mi Madre)
Oct. 8 at 1 and 7:30 p.m.
After dealing with her son’s death, Manuela drives to Barcelona to find his father. Through her journey, she forms a bond with another woman who deals with just as many crises.

Talk to Her (Hable Con Ella)
Oct. 10 at 1 and 7:30 p.m.
Adapted from The New Yorker, this film follows two men that are drawn together by a common task: taking care of women who have fallen into a coma. Shot in a new subdued style, the film brings audiences through the past and present.

Matador
Oct. 15 at 1., 4, and 7:30 p.m.
This twisted and funny film takes an unflinching look at the link between sex, death, and religion. It’s a fast moving, disturbing, erotic, and undeniably brilliant in a way most American audiences may not be prepared for, but should certainly seek out.

Performances

Chai’s Island Bistro
Aloha Tower Market Place
Come and enjoy a night of exquisite dining and hot nightly entertainment.

Broadway at Shanghai Bistro
Every Fri. and Sun at 8 p.m.
Broadway at the Bistro is a live entertainment cabaret show that stars Don Conover at the keyboards and vocalist Rex Nockengust. Admission is $20. For reservations, call 955-8668.

Special Events

32nd Annual Intertribal Pow Wow
Thomas Square
Oct. 7 & 8 at 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
The American Indian Pow Wow Association invites everyone to attend this free event that will feature competition dancing, drumming, singing, arts and crafts, and food. Volunteers opportunities are also available for those who are interested. For more information, call 734-8018.

Girls Who Surf
Kapolei White Plains Beach
Oct. 8 at 3 p.m.
Interested in learning how to surf? This surf clinic teaches everyone young and old how to surf. Their business operates within the local community so they take it as their responsibility to serve it. Cost is $50 for a lesson, surfboard, leash, and rashguard. For more information, call 371-8917.

WWE Returns to Honolulu
Blaisdell Arena
Oct. 20 at 7:30 p.m.
RAW and ECW join forces for the ultimate event! Tickets are on sale now at the Blaisdell box office. For more information, call 1-877-750-4400.

Filipinos in Hawai‘i
Bishop Museum
Through Nov. 27 at 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Celebrating the Filipino Centennial, this exhibit will feature performing and visual arts, artifacts, and other aspects of this unique culture. General admission to this event is $14.95 with special prices for kama‘aina. For more information, call 847-3511.

 

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