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by Natalie Winson, student writer

 

There are plenty of opportunities to help throughout the year: caring for the animals, working in the clinic, helping with education projects, pet foster care and in many other ways. Visiting healthcare and senior facilities with your pet is just one way to help bring a smile to the faces of people in our community.

Many HPU students have traveled a long way to attend classes, often leaving family and pets behind. Fostering pets requires three training sessions but if you live in pet-friendly housing and plan to remain in Hawai‘i for a minimum time period, the Humane Society can train you to take home foster animals–usually a litter or partial litter of puppies or kittens. Rabbits and injured animals are also on the list of pets looking for temporary homes. Since the shelter is often overcrowded, this program helps to alleviate the crowding situation and allows students the opportunity to have animal companionship.

Gayle Puou, the volunteer coordinator at the Humane Society, holds several training sessions a week for volunteers who want to work at the clinic. Each volunteer is expected to commit at least three hours a week for six months.

Pet Walk

October marked the beginning of four weeks of promotions, prizes, and events for Love-A-Dog month. The 16th annual PetWalk, held this year on October 8, attracted more than 3,000 people and their pets to Magic Island. More than dogs were summoned; a wide variety of pets, including cats, rabbits, birds, and at least one tortoise participated in the two-mile walk.

Governor Linda Lingle led the way under the balloon archway to the anthem of “Who Let the Dogs Out.” Not all participants trudged through the heat of the day; many donated their money and then set up barbeques and potlucks with friends.

“ The only reason I come each year is to see the other dogs,” said Ellie Robins of Makiki.
Ellie and a group of neighborhood dog owners arrived early to set up a tent and tables around the Ala Moana Beach tennis courts.

“ It was hot this year,” she added.

The participants raised more than $130,000 for the variety of programs offered by the local Humane Society. According to the Director of Community Relations,Darcie Scharfenstein, planning has already started for next year’s event, which promises to “grow even bigger and better.”

Programs that prospered from the event included: Pets of Patriots, Pets Visitation, Foster Care, the Lost and Found Center, and Pet-Friendly Housing. The investigations and rescue program is involved in more than 1,600 calls each year and the society makes it possible for more than 4,000 pets to find suitable homes.

Love-A-Dog month offered a special deal to anyone who adopted a dog in October. The $60 fee included the first vaccination; a microchip ID, a leash, a 5-lb bag of Nutro dog food, a dog toy, as well as a doggie goodie bag from Bark Avenue.

Hawaiian Humane Society
Volunteer Coordinator: Gayle Puou (808) 356-2216
Location: 2700 Waialae Avenue, Honolulu, HI


 

 

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