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by Briana Spagnuolo, student writer

 

It has become less of a faux pas to meet a potential suitor via the World Wide Web. There are warnings that try to prevent people from meeting face-to-face with someone that initially was found on the Internet. This is because one never knows the true identity of the other person. However, the skepticism remain—can romances spurred by blogging and commenting sustain the test of time as well or better then a more conventional dating arrangement?

Many search high and low to find their perfect significant other. So many people spend all their energy on trying to find a person that fits their predetermined sketch of “perfection,” while some settle for “Mr. or Mrs. Right Now” until something better comes along. Still others continue to be completely immune to the whole dating idea! Men and woman are so stuck with the idea of perfection that they may not realize that “Mr. or Mrs. Right” could be just a click away.

For those who have been forever bruised from that infamous blind date, Internet dating seems like a godsend. Online dating allows you to “click” pick who you want to meet. Myspace and other social-base Web sites allow people to view profiles from all over the world, contact them, and form a relationship. Myspace has become a gateway to forming a relationship on a friendly level and makes meeting new people easier for those who are too shy to do it face-to-face.

According to Nancy Wesson Ph.D., a relationship counselor, a relationship has a 75 percent higher chance of lasting if a steady friendship is built in the beginning when compared to those that begin with sex.

Myspace gets over 10,000 hits daily and is visited more than Google and eBay, according to the Trends and Statistic’s Web site. With the number of people visiting, uploading and blogging, it is no wonder people have turned to the Web for help in their personal lives. Not all people go to the Web solely for dating purposes. According to its tagline, it’s “a place for friends,” and many use it to talk with friends worldwide with no intention on finding someone romantically. Nevertheless, when- ever men and women are involved, there is always a chance for romance.

Love, even on Myspace, can come when you do not expect it. Amy Stanley is a classic case of a college girl that completely detached from the idea of dating after having disappointment after disappointment. She would joke about the whole Internet dating idea and swore she would never turn to the Internet to find a serious boyfriend. Then in January 2005, she began to exchange comments and messages back and forth with a fellow Myspace user “CabinBoy,” completely unaware of the outcome that would follow.

The commenting and blogging continued for almost half a year.

“I always enjoyed his clever philosophical comments about my opinions and experiences, he made me smile and laugh outloud through text,” said Amy.

The two ironically discovered that they were both members at the same yacht club in Hawai‘i. Then one Saturday they decided to meet at the yacht club in Waikiki.

“ I, of course, brought my ‘obligatory’ friend for the first meeting, after all you don’t know who you’re dealing with when you meet someone over the Web,” Amy said, “even if they seem friendly and safe, I wanted to be sure.”

Since then, Amy and Kol Chaney have been inseparable and are currently living together. They will be celebrating their two year anniversary in a few months. “We are just like every other couple; we just have a humorous story, however corny that may seem,” she said. “Some people meet in a bar, I met him on Myspace. Who’s to say which is safer, a bar or the Web?”

 
 

 

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