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by Melissa Mejia, staff writer
Students now have the option to minor in Spanish, and the program is growing. Charles Boyer has just been welcomed to HPU’s full-time staff along with assistant professor of Spanish, Tess Lane.
Boyer joined the Spanish program in spring 2006 as an adjunct professor and became full time in spring 2007. He teaches first year Spanish as well as upper-division classes for the Spanish minor program. Boyer is enjoying his time at HPU.

“ It’s an interesting student body with local, mainland, and international students making for a very stimulating and interesting classroom,” he said.

Boyer began speaking Spanish when his father moved his family from Pennsylvania to Mexico City. He was nine at the time, and within three months, he said, he was fluent in the language. He spent a majority of his childhood and teenage years in Mexico before returning to the United States during his senior year of high school.

Boyer got his Bachelor’s degree in English at Penn State University, a Master’s degree in Spanish at the University of New Mexico, and his Doctorate in Spanish Literature at the University of Kansas. Throughout this time Boyer did social work, and worked as a grad assistant in Spanish.

Boyer worked with wards of the state, troubled children, and runaways in Pennsylvania and New Mexico. Before obtaining a teaching position at HPU, he worked in family therapy in Hawai‘i for families who had children with special needs.

“ My experience in social services gives me a broader understanding of teaching,” he said. “As more than simply imparting knowledge to students, but in cultivating the natural interests and curiosity that we all have,” He added.

Boyer taught Spanish at Furman University in South Carolina for four years. He also taught Spanish courses and journalism at The Bosque School, a private high school, in New Mexico for two years.
“ The thing about foreign language is that it opens you up to another culture, and to experience the world through someone else’s eyes,” Boyer said. “To me that’s what education is: opening up to new experiences. Foreign language is a gateway,” he added.

Lane welcomes the diversity Boyer brings to the program. Boyer is excited to make his mark in the Spanish program at HPU and start a Spanish film series.

“ It now gives students two voices and two personalities in class, which is important. Students [need] to have variety in accents and teaching styles,” she added.
 

 

 

 

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