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Opinion

Marquise Brack and Nicole Loschke, editor

Neoconservatism: How dangerous is it? Has it run its course?

For the past six years, neoconservativism has emerged as a major intellectual force in American politics, particularly in the field of U.S. foreign policy. Neoconservatism isn’t new, of course; it’s been lurking in the background of political thought and action for many years, quietly seeking influence in Washington circles. With the election of George W. Bush in 2000, it suddenly emerged from the shadows to take a clearly visible and highly vocal position in the federal government and the U.S. policy-making apparatus. And with Bush’s re-election in 2004, it fully established itself as the driving force in foreign affairs in the Bush administration. [More]

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Neocon beginnings, major players and support organizations

The Greek prefix neo indicates that some “new” meaning has been added to the familiar word “conservative.” It is a modifier of the basic word, just as the adjective “compassionate” was Bush’s attempt in the 2000 presidential campaign to soften the public’s unflattering perception of conservatives. The latter was a meaningless hoax, but the former is real and significant, and indicates a major change in the history and practice of conservatism in this country. [More]


Another neocon organization is The Hudson Institute, with its Center on Islam, Democracy, and the Future of the Muslim World. Other organizations include The Institute for Advanced Strategic and Political Studies, the Ethics and Public Policy Center, and The Foundation for the Defense of Democracies.

Web photo: www.hudsoninstitute

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A special message from HPU’s president to students here, at Virginia Tech, and everywhere

In light of the violence at Virginia Tech, the middle of April was a difficult time for all of us, even here at HPU, in spite of how far we are from where the tragedy took place. We know what a normal day on a university campus feels like, and it is hard to imagine how one person’s actions can turn a place of learning into a place full of suffering and sadness. [More]


Signing here are, l., Danielle Harper, sophomore, marine biology major and Jade Smith, sophomore psychology major.

Photo by Larry LeDoux

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Healing at Virginia Tech

April 16, 2007. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia: 32 students and teachers killed. One murder-suicide. The deadliest, non-war-related shooting in U.S. history. [More]

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HPU students react to Virginia Tech massacre

“In thinking about what I have read, the one aspect of the massacre that I’m puzzled about is why school officials acted the way they did—notified people by e-mail...? There was a two-hour gap between the first incident in the dorms and then the shootings in the classrooms; what were school officials doing during the time?” [More]

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Letter to editor:
River of Life Mission

I was pleased to see the article on River of Life Misson in the March 5 Kalamalama. This is a fine organization in our neighborhood and worthy of our support.

The article mentioned that “social workers help the guests of the mission.” I thought Kalamalama readers might be interested to know that those are HPU social work students under the direction of HPU BSW Practicum coordinator Bill Hummel.

For several years now, HPU social work students have provided case management, referral, and other services as well as a “listening ear” for those served by the Mission. Now that River of Life has expanded services to a new shelter in Waipahu, HPU social work students are there also, providing similar services as well as having the opportunity to learn about the opening, policy setting, and administration of a new agency.

We are very grateful to River of Life for offering these opportunities to our students as well as the work they do with the homeless and hungry.

Mary S. Sheridan, PhD, ACSW
Professor and Program Chair Social Work

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