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Aloha from President Wright
with Chatt G. Wright

 

As you settle into the fall semester, I’d like to report some exciting news from our College of Natural Sciences. This semester, it launched its first graduate degree program, the Master of Science in Marine Science. The setting for this new program is HPU’s Oceanic Institute campus at Makapu‘u Point, a place that combines a beautiful natural environment with world-class science.

Like most programs at HPU, students in the Marine Science graduate program come from Hawai‘i (some even graduated from HPU’s undergraduate programs), the mainland U.S., and countries around the world. They are doing hands-on scientific research in the laboratory both on land and at sea. Some of their projects include identifying diseases that affect Hawai‘i’s whale and dolphin populations, revitalizing Hawaiian fishponds, and investigating ways to produce potential anti-cancer agents from marine cyanobacteria.

The University has hired new faculty to complement our marine science professors. This fall, Dr. Yongli Chen came to HPU from Cornell University with plans to tackle the biochemistry of marine pharmaceuticals, hoping to facilitate drug development and modification.

Two oceanographers will join HPU next spring. Dr. David Hyrenbach will study the ecology of migratory seabirds and sea turtles as part of the development of a management plan for the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands National Monument. Dr. Samuel Kahng, will continue research on an alien invasive species that threatens Hawai‘i’s multimillion dollar black coral industry.

As Dr. Alissa Arp, the dean of Natural Sciences and vice president of Research, has often said, “Excellence in science is achieved through active research programs that contribute to the scientific knowledge base.” The Masters in Marine Science allows faculty to bring their research directly to their students.

If you think the M.S. in Marine Science is a graduate program for you, you’ll need to complete an undergraduate degree in science and persuade a professor in the program to be your mentor.


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